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Thread: NCAA Playbook: Outside Zone Discussion

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    Heisman Oneback's Avatar
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    NCAA Playbook: Outside Zone Discussion

    Discussion about the different outside zone blocking schemes and plays.

    Outside Zone: Stretch, Full Reach and Flex Blocking Scheme

    The Stretch Play

    Using the Full Reach Zone Scheme
    Last edited by Oneback; 06-05-2011 at 02:52 PM.

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    Heisman Oneback's Avatar
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    Freshman th3 last tiger's Avatar
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    All interesting reads, Im fascinated especially by the flex scheme which I fairly certain I've seen Oregon use out of the shotgun. The scheme itself looks quite similar to the "G" scheme except it seems instead of kicking out the defensive end the pulling lineman move on to block the linebacker.

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    It is essentially the "g-scheme" but instead of kicking the defender out the blocker is trying to log or seal the defender inside. Glen Mason used the flex zone while at Minnesota when he first took over as a transition from a gap scheme to a zone scheme. Oregon has used the flex zone more recently than they did a few years ago when they had Johnathan Stewart and LaGarrette Blount when they used more of a straight outside zone concept. I imagine they made the switch to enable their line to get out in front of LaMichael James. The Indianapolis Colts famed stretch play is built around the flex zone scheme as well.

    I'll get into this at a later time but the flex zone is a perfect compliment to the Power-O play as once the end man on the line of scrimmage ("EMLOS") sees the guard coming down on him he will typically attempt to wrong arm or spill the play outside which will play directly into the flex zone and give the guard the advantage in sealing the defender inside. The linebackers will initially read power as well and they will come tight to the outside again giving the advantage to the second blocker through.

    The Power O by itself can be attacked and marginalized by the defense. However, when complementing plays are used the defense's ability to slow down the running game is decreased. Hit them hard (Power O) then challenge them to a footrace (flex zone). Introduce doubt and punish them.

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    Freshman th3 last tiger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneback View Post
    It is essentially the "g-scheme" but instead of kicking the defender out the blocker is trying to log or seal the defender inside. Glen Mason used the flex zone while at Minnesota when he first took over as a transition from a gap scheme to a zone scheme. Oregon has used the flex zone more recently than they did a few years ago when they had Johnathan Stewart and LaGarrette Blount when they used more of a straight outside zone concept. I imagine they made the switch to enable their line to get out in front of LaMichael James. The Indianapolis Colts famed stretch play is built around the flex zone scheme as well.

    I'll get into this at a later time but the flex zone is a perfect compliment to the Power-O play as once the end man on the line of scrimmage ("EMLOS") sees the guard coming down on him he will typically attempt to wrong arm or spill the play outside which will play directly into the flex zone and give the guard the advantage in sealing the defender inside. The linebackers will initially read power as well and they will come tight to the outside again giving the advantage to the second blocker through.

    The Power O by itself can be attacked and marginalized by the defense. However, when complementing plays are used the defense's ability to slow down the running game is decreased. Hit them hard (Power O) then challenge them to a footrace (flex zone). Introduce doubt and punish them.
    Whats funny is that I played DE in High-school and whenever we faced pulling guards we always wrong armed them, It worked great to spill the play outside, but it can bite you in the ass if the goal of the play is to get outside and you get reached on the pull.
    Last edited by th3 last tiger; 06-02-2011 at 09:08 PM.

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    Booster JeffHCross's Avatar
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    This doesn't necessarily fit this thread, but since this was your most recent NCAA Playbook thread, I figured I'd throw it here.

    In Part I of the Grinding Tape Series, Mid American Conference MVP Chad Spann explained the concepts behind plays that require a running back to understand blocking schemes, defensive tendencies, and reading keys. This week, he reveals how quickly a runner needs to be able to process information to choose a hole, ball security protocol, and the importance of minimizing surface area to become a strong, after-contact runner.
    Part 1
    Part 2
    Twitter: @3YardsandACloud

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